egon and joan teichert



Joseph Hirsch

At seventeen, Joseph Hirsch was given a four year scholarship to the Pennsylvania Museum School of Industrial Art by the city of Philadelphia winning awards in drawing and illustration. He studied at the Philadelphia Museum School and with George Luks in New York. From Luks he developed a strong feeling for social realism and commentary. His images are strong, uncluttered, and deal with living realities in urban situations, showing the tender and tough moments of the ordinary man in a compassionate and realistic manner. He is the recipient of two Guggenheim Fellowhips for the years, 1942 snd 1943. In 1949, Hirsch was asked to do a drawing for Arthur Miller's play, Death of a Salesman. His drawing of the main character, Willy Loman, slouched with face unseen, carrying his salesman's suitcases, was used as the poster for the play. Joseph Hirsch is represented in the Museum of Modern Art, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Whitney Museum, Addison Gallery, Corcoran Gallery, Boston Museum of Fine Arts, the National Gallery, and many others.



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Joseph Hirsch

American (1910-1981)
Hecklers
10 x 15-1/4 in.

Lithograph, 1943-44, edition 250. Cole 7. Signed in pencil. Margins not full but adequate. Sheet size: 11-1/4 x 17 in. The condition is very good apart from a small trace of old tape adhesive in the outer edge of the right and left margin. Illustrated in Great American Prints 1900-1950, June and Norman Kraeft, 1984, Dover Publications, pl.64. and American Lithographers 1900-1960, Clinton Adams, 1983, p.145, pl.93.


$700.
Hecklers



Joseph Hirsch

American (1910-1981)
Music
10 x 8 in.

Lithograph, 1951, edition 250. Cole 22. Signed in pencil. This portrait actually shows a man cleaning his harmonica; the instrument is being held in reverse.


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Music



Joseph Hirsch

American (1910-1981)
Watcher
8-1/4 x 25-1/2 in.

Lithograph, 1950, edition 45. Cole 21. Signed in pencil. Dedication in pencil, "To Janet and Bob -Joe- July, '51." Printed on wove paper with a watermark, Arches, by Gaston Dorfinant, Paris, their ink stamp on the verso, lower left corner. This lithograph was used as a display print in the lobby of the reception house of the American Embassy in Paris upon the occasion of an exhibition by Fulbright Fellows in the spring of 1950. "By presenting a mystery, Hirsch has established opportunities for subjective reactions by his audience. The message to be communicated is interpreted by the receiver rather than the sender. The receiver might accept the partially hidden human form as a prisoner of war." Robert Henkes, World War II in American Art, 2007, p.62.


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Watcher



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